If you are familiar with Mostardo or Chutney, this dish is pretty approachable.

It’s a mixed pickle of several vegetables, simmered then marinated. It can be canned, and it lasts a fair time.

First, if you don’t have lombard mustard, you might wish to make some.

I like equal proportions of mustard seed, honey, and wine vinegar by weight, and to allow it to age for at least a week in the fridge.

COMPOST. C. Take rote of parsel. pasternak of rasenns. scrape hem waisthe hem clene. take rapes & caboches ypared and icorne. take an erthen panne with clene water & set it on the fire. cast all þise þerinne. whan þey buth boiled cast þerto peeres & parboile hem wel. take þise thynges up & lat it kele on a fair cloth, do þerto salt whan it is colde in a vessel take vineger & powdour & safroun & do þerto. & lat alle þise thinges lye þerin al nyzt oþer al day, take wyne greke and hony clarified togider lumbarde mustard & raisouns corance al hool. & grynde powdour of canel powdour douce. & aneys hole. & fenell seed. take alle þise thynges & cast togyder in a pot of erthe. and take þerof whan þou wilt & serue forth.

Take Parsley root, Carrot (or parsnip), scrape and wash.
Take turnips and cabbages, trimmed appropriately
Put them in a pot, and cook them through.
When they are done, blanch pears.
Blend the items together, and cool overnight.
The next day, when chilled, add salt
then vinegar, “powder” (pepper), and saffron.
The day after that, add “Greek” wine and honey which have been blended together,
and lumbard mustard, as well as currants.
Add cinnamon, poudre douce, and whole anise.
Put it all in a crock, and serve at need.

I keep lumbard mustard and poudre douce in stock, and kept pretty decent records of my garden’s productivity, so I had a good sense of what would have been available.

I am using a moscato as my wine.

I made this a few times. Once, I tried cutting all of the vegetables into different shapes. It wasn’t nice. I ran them through a shredder, a processor, and so on. Eventually I got to cutting them all as close to matchstick as I could, and it worked out nicely.

Also, I don’t recommend those giant storage carrots, they have a watery sweetness that works well in other dishes but not so well in this one.
3 medium carrots, matchstick or rounds

And / Or

2  large parsnips, matchstick

2 larger white turnips, matchstick

1 bunch radishes, about 8-10, matchstick

1/2 medium green cabbage, shredded

4-6 hard pears, chopped

2 TBS -1/2 cup salt

1.5 cup white wine vinegar

1/2 Tbs pepper, ground or 1 TBS whole

a pinch of vinegar

2 c moscato.

1 cup honey

1/4 c lombard mustard

1 cup currants

2 tsp cinnamon (canela)

 

If you like anise, use a teaspoon each. I didn’t because I don’t like it.

Assemble your vegetables, not the pears. Poach them til they are bendy.

Remove them to a colander to cool, use the same water and poach the pears.

Add to the colander.

When fully cooled, add salt.

Once the salt is fully mixed in, add the vinegar, pepper, and saffron.

Then, finally, the next day, add the rest of the ingredients.

Allow it to sit for a week, and taste. If you like it, you can can it now,

or adjust seasonings and flavors first.

If you are low in the canning jars, add more vinegar to top up rather than

wine, in order to boost acidity slightly.

This is 6 canning jars worth. Two didn’t pop their lids, so I am storing them in the fridge and will use them first.

Compost (11)

http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?forme:99:PSTRNK

Sols, A Vinegar Dressing (salad)

Si vols fer sols a que et vulles, a carn o a peix, pren de la carn o del peix frit a fets-ne trossos, e gita’ls en vinagre; e dessus gita primerament farigola.
E si vols lo sols cald, hages pebre a safra e vinagre, e del brou de la carn o del peix, e ceba tallada; e destrempa-ho tot e gita-ho dessus.

If you wish to make vinegar dressing for whatever you want, for meat or fish, take the meat or fried fish and vut them in pieces and pour them into vinegar, and first pour thyme over the top.
If you want the dressing hot, take pepper, saffron and vinegar, and some meat or fish broth and sliced onion, and mix it all together, and pour it over the top.

Mixtura cum Caseo; Mixture with Cheese
LIX. QUEMADMODUM MORETUM FACIAS
Addito in mortarium satureiam, mentam, rutam, coriandrum, apium, porrum sectivum aut, si id non erit, viridem cepam, folia lactucae, folia erucae, thymum viride, [vel] nepetam, tum etiam viride puleium et caseum recent<em> et salsum. Ea omnia pariter conterito acetique piperati exiguum permisceto; hanc mixturam cum in catillo composueris, oleum superfundito.
Put into a mortar savory, mint, rue, coriander, parsley, leeks, or if you have none, a green onion, , lettuce leaves, rocket, green thyme or catnip, and also green pennyroyal and fresh and salted cheese. Pound all of these together, and blend in a little pepper. When this mixture has been arranged in a bowl, pour olive oil over it.
A composed green salad of lettuces, served alongside a saffron vinaigrette.

(part of an ongoing series in which I share recipes presented at The Lay of El Cid hosted by Barony Bhakail)

 

¼ c Vinegar, Sour Orange juice, Verjus, or diluted pomegranate molasses.
½ tsp salt
1 pinch Saffron, bloomed
¼ tsp Black pepper
¾ c Olive oil

A green tossed salad with herbs of your choosing.

Use a jar with a good lid.

Add salt and saffron to vinegar, allow to rest 15 minutes or more.
Add pepper, olive oil.
Place lid on container, shake briskly.

Note: Many people are unable to safely eat pennyroyal, I choose to substitute other available mints when I am serving guests, though for my own use I do use pennyroyal.  Select a wide variety of lettuces, bitters, crisps, and juicy types. This salad can be composed as an elegant, layered display piece for a formal meal.

 

 

Grant, Mark. Roman Cookery. London: Serif Cookery, 1999. 106. Print.
Santanach, Joan, trans. Robin Vozelgang. The Book of Sent Sovi Medieval Recipes from Catalonia. First Edition. Barcelona, Spain: Barcino-Tamesis, 2008. 84-85. Print.

Marcos, Juan Jose. “LUCIUS IUNIUS MODERATUS COLUMELLA.” The Latin Library. The Latin Library. Web. 16 Oct 2013. <http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/columella/columella.rr12.shtml>

 

 

Parsnips make me happy, that was reason enough to make this dish.

I chose small, tender parsnips of about 5-8″ long, and not much more than 2″ across. The larger ones were in poor condition,

Parsnips (1)

First, after peeling them, I cut them into 5 sections so they would cook evenly. If yours are larger, you may get more sections, though I do suggest removing the core on any parsnip over 3″ across or 10″ long. The cores are a challenge to eat no matter how good your teeth.

Parsnips (2)

I used water to poach them, but added salt.  A broth would have been a nice poaching medium, but I wanted to keep the preparation simple.

The flour is a locally milled whole wheat which I sieved to reduce the rough matter.  The saffron steeped in warm water for about 15 minutes while I cut and poached the vegetables.

I chose to fry in grapeseed oil, which I keep on hand. It is a modernly available oil with minimal flavor and a high smoke point. My assumption is that olive oil or lard might have been more likely, but I did not wish to use either.

They are heavy, but they didn’t completely fail overnighting in the refrigerator. I reheated them in a dry pan in the oven at 300 for about 15 minutes.

 

170. Parsnips.

Clean big ones well and remove the woody part in the middle, and boil them; when they are cooked, flour them and fry them in good oil- but before that, dry them well on a small board; then, to make them better, get a bowl of flour tempered with water, add sugar, cinnamon, saffron and rosewater, coat the parsnips with this mixture and put them in the pan with hot oil; then put spices on top of them and serve them properly seasoned like that.

 

1-2 lbs parsnips, cut into 1/2″x 4″ spears

1/2 c flour

1 TBS sugar (promotes browning, can be omitted)

6-8 threads of saffron, bloomed in 1/4 C warm water

1/2 tsp cinnamon (Canela)

1/2 – 1 oz rosewater, to taste

Water to complete batter

Sufficient oil to fry

salt and pepper, for after frying

A heated oven for the parsnips to rest in

knife and board for trimming

a cloth or wooden rest area for the parsnips to dry while making the batter

 

 

Place saffron in water before beginning other processes.
Choose small parsnips.

Wash and peel parsnips. Cut to half length, then cut the thick section into quarters the long way, so all 5 pieces are about the same size.

Poach the cut parsnips til cooked most of the way through, but not enough to turn to mush.

Parsnips (4)

Allow to cool.

Make batter: by blending dry ingredients then adding liquid til it is a runny consistency. Set aside.

Parsnips (5)

Prepare frying oil, taking the usual precautions.

Dip parsnips in batter, fry. (watch some videos if you are not comfortable with frying. Using a countertop frying machine makes sense)

Parsnips (7)

Remove to a screen or cloth to give up excess oil.

Serve.  We really like this with recipe 157 from Los Guisados; Horseradish http://www.florilegium.org/?http%3A//www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-MANUSCRIPTS/Guisados1-art.html

Parsnips (9)

Scully, Terence. The Neapolitan Recipe Collection. 4th ed. University of Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 2000.  Print.

Aliter caroetas: elixatas concisas in cuminato oleo modico quoques et inferes; cuminatum coliculorum facies

Boil the carrots and chop them in a cumin sauce with a little oil, finish cooking, and serve. Make the cumin sauce as for cabbage. (3.9.3)

(part of an ongoing series in which I share recipes presented at The Lay of El Cid hosted by Barony Bhakail)

This is one of the simplest, quickest, and most delightful side dishes I know. It’s inexpensive and can be on the table from ingredients to completion in under 15 minutes, when making a half recipe for two people.

If you need a recipe to demonstrate the contemporary viability of historical food, please consider this one. It’s nice.

 

1 lb carrots
½ gallon poaching water
1 Tbs salt
2 Tbs olive oil
1 Tsp cumin

Trim and peel the carrots, leave them whole, watching for woody cores.
Poach in salted water until done.
Drain water, chop coarsely.
Return the carrots to the pan. Add oil, dust with cumin.
Watch the temperature, allow to get evenly coated and begin to blister.
The pan should be slightly brown and orange with toasted, not burnt, bits of cumin and carrot.
Taste for salt, plate.

Serves 4

Grocock, Christopher, and Sally Grainger. Apicius, a Critical Edition with an introduction and English translation by. Devon: Prospect Books, 2006. pp 172-173. Print.

Mushroom Sauce

If you want to make a sauce of mushrooms that are boiled, pressed, and fried with oil, make the sauce like this; take onion, parsley, vinegar, and spices, and mix it with vinegar and a little water. Make pieces of the mushrooms, to fry, or serve with a fried mixture, and then put them in their sauce, or serve them grilled with salt and oil.

(part of an ongoing series in which I share recipes presented at The Lay of El Cid hosted by Barony Bhakail)

12 oz mushrooms, cleaned
2 cups water
2 oz olive oil, divided
½ oz (1 Tbs) salt
3 oz onion, minced
3 oz parsley, fresh
4 oz red wine vinegar

(thyme, savory, black pepper, or garlic would all go well with this dish)

Place clean mushrooms in pot with water. Add half of the olive oil and the salt. Simmer until mushrooms are cooked through. If water boils off, add more.

While mushrooms simmer, mince the onions, chop or scissor rinsed parsley. Prepare and measure all spices and seasonings.

Don’t add the seasonings yet

When mushrooms are cooked completely, drain water through strainer into one bowl.

Chop mushrooms very coarsely.
Add remaining oil to pan, return mushrooms, without liquid, to the pan. If needed, add small amounts of oil, but be cautious. They are spongy and can get too oily rather easily.

When mushrooms are fried, remove them to the second bowl.
Place the onions, parsley, ginger, pepper, and vinegar into the pot, and cook them through.
The onions will become transparent.
Add the mushroom broth, to the spices and oil, bit by bit. The goal is to reduce it slightly, but not to deplete it completely, while cooking the seasonings gently through.

When the sauce is reduced, return the mushrooms to the pot. Give them a quick toss, taste for seasoning and adjust if needed.

This is an excellent accompaniment to a red meat dish, filling for a turnover, salad topping, and accompaniment to a plate of cheese.

The type of mushrooms chosen affects the dish. Reducing the cooking liquid affects the density of flavor, so it is better to be parsimonious with the spices.

Serves 4

Santanach, Joan, trans. Robin Vozelgang. The Book of Sent Sovi Medieval Recipes from Catalonia. First Edition. Barcelona, Spain: Barcino-Tamesis, 2008. 76-77. Print.

The final dish, heavy on the chicken, light on the vegetables.

Bukkenade is a great leftovers dish. I love leftovers dishes. Not everything needs to be a lot of fuss.

 Bukkenade. Take hennes or connynges or veel or othere flessh & hewe hem to gobettes. Waische it and sethe hit well. Grynde almaundes vnblaunched, and drawe hem vp with the broth; cast therinne raysouns of couraunce, sugur, powdour gynger, erbes ystewed in grees, oynouns and salt. If it is to thynne, alye it vp with flour of ryse or with other thyng, and colour it with safroun.

I made this dish using things on hand, though the greens were not leftover.

My garden gave me Rutabaga tops, Hyssop, Salad Burnet, Lovage, and Sage, as well as a few decently large Spring Onions.

herbed piled on a board waiting to be chopped.

Herbs

I sliced it all to chiffonade, and fried it with salt in chicken fat from the broth.

the board, the knife, the herbs ready to fry

Herbs ready to fry, sliced finely. I did not use all of the onion top

2 cups Leftover chicken, picked over, cubed.
1 c herbs and vegetables
1 Tbs chicken fat or olive oil
1 1/2 c Almond milk
1/2 c Chicken broth, if the almond milk was not made with it
1/4 c Currants
1 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp powdered ginger
1/2 c total fried greens (subrecipe)
1/2 tsp salt in total, no matter which step it came in from.
1 tsp rice flour, muddled in cold water, held aside.
1 pinch saffron, in water, if you wish, held aside

One small pot
One medium pan
1 knife, board
1 spatula
1 ladle

Rinse herbs and vegetables, slice them very finely.
Add to the pan with the oil, sautee until done.
Add the chicken, warm through.

In pot, place almond milk, and if not made with chicken originally, add broth.
Add currants, ginger, and sugar.

 

almond milk with currants and ginger

Almond milk with currants and ginger

When almond mixture is warm, add to the chicken mixture. Simmer until almond milk begins to thicken. Taste for salt. Add if needed.
Add saffron if you wish, it is just for color.

Chicken, vegetables, and almond milk together in the pan, beginning to cook together

Chicken, vegetables, and almond milk together in the pan, beginning to cook together

If you wish, add the rice slurry, and simmer for a further 5 minutes to allow the starch to cook.

Adding rice flour slurry to thicken. Otherwise fully cooked.

Adding rice flour slurry to thicken. Otherwise fully cooked.

Serve.

 

The sauce isn’t gloppy, it’s light, creamy, and nice. You might like more ginger, I am not a fan so I have a light hand with it.

 

This dish could easily be adapted to a Vegetables with Chicken dish by changing the proportions and types of vegetables.

Bukkenade can also be made into  a group service dish by layering the greens with chicken, pouring the sauce over, and baking, much like a spinach souffle.

It could also be adapted to a Vegetables with Chicken dish by changing proportions.

I have been asked to make this dish again.

 

 

Hieatt, C. B. (1985). Curye on Inglysch: English culinary manuscripts of the 14. century : (including the Forme of Cury). London [u.a.: Oxford Univ. Press.