XIII. FOR TO MAKE BLANCHE BREWET DE ALYNGYN.

Nym kedys [1] and chekenys and hew hem in morsellys and seth hem in almand mylk or in kyne mylke grynd gyngyner galingale and cast therto and boyle it and serve it forthe.

Cut kid meat and chickens, and hew them into morsels, and seethe them in almond milk or in cattle milk.

Grind ginger and galangale, and cast thereto, and boil it and serve it forthwith.
We had an interesting gift recently. Someone very generously gave us some old laying chickens.. These birds were somewhere over three years old. I have fed them and collected their eggs. They were well cared for, and they earned their keep.

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I also had a lovely goat neck from a local farm.  This sounded like a perfect assemblage.

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Old chickens are not what we are accustomed to in the way of texture.. They have incredible chicken flavor, but there is nothing approaching tenderness about them.

Goat necks, no matter the age, are also challenging. They are hard to bone, have little meat, and are also quite the opposite of tender.

The only way I could reasonably deal with these items was to cook them whole, then bone them, then make the dish.

 

I poached the chicken and the neck together, in almond milk with galangale and ginger, for about an hour on a low temperature, with the lid on.

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After poaching, I allowed the pot to cool and put the whole thing in the fridge overnight. I wanted to carve the meat with care, and to waste none of it.

The chicken meat was very easy to remove from the bones, it lifted off cleanly, almost like a toy model.

The goat neck required some technique to carve neatly, but offered no fuss. The main thing to keep in mind that there are four sections of meat. If the knife follows the bone closely, there are two main tendons which must be seen to. If the meat is home butchered, make certain that things are visually tidy, as not all hunters are comfortable packaging neck roasts.

Once the meat was off of the bone, I cubed it into approximately 1″ cubes,

I placed all of the meat in a sautee pan with about two cups of almond milk. I added no salt, because of my concerns over the meat toughening further. I was parsimonious with ginger, as it is not good to one of my regular diners. About a half a teaspoon of galangale was used,

It took approximately 10 minutes for the almond milk to cook completely down, and the meat to heat fully through. I thought to add more almond milk, but tasting proved that there was no real need to do so.

We were both surprised by how tender the chicken was, The intense chicken flavor combined with the earthiness of the goat blended with the almond milk, and the galangale seemed to counteract any gamy flavors beautifully while allowing the richness to shine through.

It is a simple dish, in fact it reminded me a lot of the Tender Chickpeas recipe from a couple of years ago, which can be found at http://carbonadoes.com/2012/11/10/sent-sovi-chickpeas/

 

1 old hen or stewing chicken

1 neck of kid, lamb, or venison, about 3 lbs, bone on, whole or cut up.

1/2 gallon almond milk (if poaching and cooling), 2 c reserved for second cooking

1 tsp galangale

1/2 tsp ginger

A whole chicken will need 45 minutes to seethe, while a cut up chicken the same size could potentially cook in as little as 20 minutes.

place the chicken and the neck in a pot they fit somewhat snugly. Dust with spices, pour almond milk over.

Place pot on burner, seethe on low flame with a lid on. Take care to turn the meat a couple of times so it cooks evenly and does not stick.

Take care not to allow the meat to take color.

When the almond milk separates and the fat rises, check for doneness.

When done, turn off the heat and allow the meat to cool until it is comfortable to handle with your hands.

Remove the meat from the bones, cube somewhat coarsely. Be careful of shards, if you bought a cut up neck. They are tricky.

You can serve it now, warmed and in its broth, if it is sufficiently tender and to your liking.

If you feel the meat needs more time to become tender, place the cubed meat with the fresh almond milk and a fresh scattering of spices.

(Reserve the prior almond milk for a bukkenade or a blancmange. I used it for another bruet.)

Simmer the pot until the almond milk is mostly evaporated, but the meat is not completely dry. I chose to serve with a coarse bread, and a nice earthy root vegetable.

 

http://www.auxmaillesgodefroy.com/forme_of_cury

to prepare an ox tongue en croute (1)

The first two recipes in Book V of the Opera are for the preparation of tongue as a pie. It’s not the dish most of us would expect to start a book on pies with, but it makes a lot of sense in context.

Cattle provide many pounds of meat, but the tongue, which is rich, tender, and profoundly beefy in flavor, is only two to four pounds of service quality food. It is considered a luxury meat in many cuisines, though it does present challenges to the preparation,

Tongue must be skinned before service. It also must be trimmed carefully, If you do not know how to do this, look for a video to guide you, or ask for assistance the first time.

It also has a reputation for being “creepy meat”, for looking too much like what it is. This alone makes pie a thoughtful presentation; even if the diners know what they are getting, they do not have to confront it visually in a way they might otherwise find challenging.

These two recipes specify ox, working cattle, but also permit cow or buffalo cow using the same instructions. The recipes are somewhat mix and match, or perhaps more, choose your own adventure. Direction is given for whole or sliced, cooked or raw (scalded), pickled (raw) or plain, and salted/pressed or not.

I opted to scald, slice, pickle, not press, then place in pastry and bake.

The tongue I had in the freezer came improperly trimmed, so I spend about two hours cleaning it. I was displeased. Skinning also took rather longer than intended. I should have allowed it to sit in the poaching water longer, but did not want to negatively affect the pickling process.

I then sliced the meat into slices which I now feel to have been too thick for the most pleasing pie, though at the end it worked out.

The pickling vinegar was very pleasing, and added a lovely layer of flavor. The instructions specified 8 hours, but it was in the brine for 12 hours. Due to the thickness of my slices, it was not problematic.

After the meat was removed from the brine, I built a crust. The book gives a lot of suggestions about what kinds of crusts to use, how to prepare them, what seasons and conditions are appropriate for what crusts, but it doesn’t give the kind of directions that I, a non-baker, can easily extrapolate into the required product.

The directions specifically state “make up a dough with unsalted cold water” which to me implies that there is such a thing in this repertoire as warm water dough, as I am accustomed to using for coffyns. The instructions go on to explain how to knead it, when to apply fat, and that the dough will work best if it remains cold.

Instructions called for sifting the flour well to remove bran. I did use a locally milled soft wheat flour, and did sift it. For every cup of sieved flour, I had a cup of bran left behind.

The book specified a free-form pie rather than one fitted to a pie pan, but frankly I was unwilling to risk the floor of my oven. I had little trust in my crust, and expected odd behaviour from the meat. I used a pie pan. My crust was too small, so I was forced to create a false wall with aluminum foil. Unfortunately, my crust was a miserable failure. Though tasty, it was by no means a good case to contain the dish. I will try a completely different approach to the crust next time.

I removed the meat from the pickling seasonings and drained it, but did not blot.

After laying the meat into the base of the crust, placing on a lovely layer of salt fat, seasoning and closing the crust, I baked it in a 400* oven, as the book said to bake it at a temperature suitable for bread. I used my nose to tell me when it was done, and was pretty on the ball with that. Unfortunately, the temperature was too high for the melting point of the fat in the meat, and did some damage.

After being quite sad to see how poorly the dish turned out, we took everthing apart after it had cooled completely, chopped it into small pieces, and sauteed it. It was absolutely delicious. My guest was concerned by the concept of eating tongue, but expressed delight in the dish. Gingerbrede made an excellent dessert.

Recipe and sub recipes;

1 whole beef tongue, prepared

Pickle brine (below)

Spice blend (below)

1 oz prosciutto trim (ask your deli for an end, if possible)

1 sturdy pasty (not pastry) crust

Spice blend:

1 tsp salt

1 tsp pepper

1/4 tsp cloves

1/4 tsp cinnamon

1/8 tsp ginger

1/8 tsp nutmeg

(double the salt and pepper, quadruple the rest, if you prefer not to pickle)

 

Pickle brine

1/2 cup red wine vinegar (thin a little with water if it is very sharp)

1/2 cup white wine (I used a moscato)

1 tsp dried oregano

1/2 TBS salt

1/4 TBS pepper

2 cloves garlic, crushed well. (use the salt as an abrasive to help break the cloves well)

2 TBS mustum ( I did not use this, as I am running out)

 

poach or parcook meat ( I should have poached longer)

skin and trim meat

slice into service escalopes (I should have sliced much thinner)

pickle if desired

prepare crust

season meat

dress with fat or prosciutto (proscuitto tasted better)

seal crust, make vent

bake at 350*

oil crust on removal from oven, or wash with saffron water, but do not egg wash.

Do a better job than I did, please. When I get it right I will post this recipe again.

 

(NOTE: There are no photographs or beauty shots of this dish because it is not attractive to look at. I did photograph the entire process, so if you need reference images please do not hesitate to contact me.)

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=GrvhZvK5pCgC&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:%22Bartolomeo+Scappi%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=_4EbVKr9Do-eyASyg4DYAQ&ved=0CEQQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q&f=false

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http://books.google.com/books?id=7yZAAAAAcAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:%22Bartolomeo+Scappi%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=7IMbVNXsO8-cyASisoKYAw&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

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