Cormarye. XX.II. XIII. Take Colyandre, Caraway smale grounden, Powdour of Peper and garlec ygrounde in rede wyne, medle alle þise togyder and salt it, take loynes of Pork rawe and fle of the skyn, and pryk it wel with a knyf and lay it in the sawse, roost þerof what þou wilt, & kepe þat þat fallith þerfro in the rosting and seeþ it in a possynet with faire broth, & serue it forth witþ þe roost anoon.

Cormarye (12)

I had not run into this dish before, but it was on a menu recently and intrigued me. The spices are very simple. The instructions are very basic. The results remind me of pastrami. Thanks much to Annetje van Woerden for pointing out the recipe!

Take coriander, caraway ground small, pepper, garlic which has been crushed in red wine. Meddle all this together and salt it. Take raw pork loin, well pricked, and lay it in the sauce. Roast it, but keep the fat.  When it is roasted, seeth it in a tight pot in nice broth. Include the drippings.

Cormarye (3)

So simple, so good.

I have done this with many types of meat and not been unhappy with it. My favorite is short ribs.

3 TBS whole coriander

3 TBS whole caraway seeds, crushed well

5 cloves of garlic

1/2 bottle of red wine

4 LBS meat

2 TBS salt

Trim your meat of silverskin, but leave the fat cap.
Prick the meat to allow the marinade to penetrate.

Place in a zip bag.

Pour the spices in the bag, add wine, and squeeze out the air.

Allow to sit overnight or longer, if you wish, it will only improve.

Roast on a rack. I like to put a little water in the bottom of the pan so the drippings don’t burn.

Allow to cool, then seethe (or steam) the meat.

You can carve a larger, roasted piece into useful sections and steam at need.

It’s rather simple, it’s very tasty, and it’s very flexible.

loaf of meat wrapped in cheesecloth, cut in half to show the filling, on a plate for service

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/Cookbooks/Du_Fait_de_Cuisine/Du_fait_de_Cuisine.html

Recipe 64

 

I read a recent chefs’ text book a few years ago that made me pretty unhappy. It was that old saw about “ate bad meat, used lots of spices.” Lemme tell ya, I have a lot more respect for Medieval cooks than I do for the author of that well regarded book.

It’s hard not to go on a tirade, but if you are unfamiliar with historical cooking, let me assure you that people had the same gastric systems we do, and things that would make us sick would have made them sick. No amount of spices could fix it. Frankly, no one was going to throw good, expensive spices on bad food.

That out of the way, we get to the Green Meat.

This is a form of meatloaf, which is intended to be rolled in caul fat, like a crepinette. It’s to be wrapped in the layer of fat, then spitted and grilled, while being painted with parsley juice to turn it green.

I tried for some time to find the caul fat, and wasn’t able to get it locally. I have a line on it now, but the shoulder of mutton wouldn’t wait a few weeks.

The original recipe is quite long. It’s a set of instructions for making a relatively small amount of meat into a large, festive dish for a crowd.

First, we refresh the meat, taking it from the salt it is preserved in and rehydrating it.

After poaching it, the meat is carefully removed from the bones, taking great care to avoid damaging the bone structure.

It’s minced, blended with the other ingredients, and reformed into a shoulder-shaped loaf on the same bones, then wrapped carefully with the caul fat and roasted.

While it is roasting, it’s to be endored, painted, with the juice of parsley, a popular food coloring.

Having no caul fat, I chose to wrap the meat in cheesecloth, though a terrine also crossed my mind. It was not optimal, but it did work, and we are excited to do it again once we have caul fat in stock.

The resulting dish is a rather elaborate meatloaf, which extends the dish, assures that the meat is of the same quality throughout the dish, and be humorally appropriate for the largest portion of diners.

In fact, at the end of the instructions, there are a few suggested dishes named for in case any diners might have an infirmity, to allow them to have better balanced humors in order to enjoy the shoulder of mutton as well.

The directions are very long. The results are Green Meat.

 

Shoulder and or leg of mutton, rinsed. If salted, then soaked for a time.

Simmer in salt water, then cooled.

Remove the meat completely from the bone, but do not separate the bones.

Mince brie (or Crampone) cheese, add parsley, marjoram, hyssop, and sage.

The spices are ginger, grains of paradise, and some whole cloves to embellish with.

Eggs, saffron, and caul fat, figure it would take four to do a full sized leg of mutton.

Small skewers or toothpicks to pin the cauls on.

Parsley, eggs, and flour for the coloring layer

And an admonition not to overcook the batter in such a way as to lose the green coloration.

I had no choice but to diverge from the recipe in a few undesirable ways.

Our mutton shoulder was poorly cut, so I decided not to build back onto it. The bone would have lent a lot of flavor and helped keep the meat moist, as well as giving the appearance of the original shape.

I used cheesecloth, rather than caul, in order to be able to do the dish at all. Because of this, I used parsley juice alone, rather than egg/wheat batter as a gilding. These choices strongly affect the texture of the dish.

I could not cook over an open fire on a spit, because the grill is under several layers of snow. The cheesecloth would have caught fire anyhow.

What I did was not optimal. Let’s call this a test run worth discussing, not a final.

I am posting it because it was so good, and so easily adapted to feast or picnic use, that it would be rude to keep it to myself for a moment longer.

We had a whole shoulder of mutton, but a couple of shanks would do quite well here for a more modest service, intended for a smaller number of people.

Chiquart Mutton (2) Chiquart Mutton (4) Chiquart Mutton (5) Chiquart Mutton (8) Chiquart Mutton (10) Chiquart Mutton (13)

*if using caul, look for notes after the recipe

1,5 LBS mutton, simmered in water or simple broth

4 oz brie cheese, chilled and minced.

2 raw eggs

2 oz parsley, picked and minced

1/2 tsp dried marjoram

1 tsp sage

1/2 tsp hyssop

3/4 tsp dried ginger

3/4 tsp grains of paradise

1 1/4 tsp salt

12-20 whole cloves

saffron

These instructions are for the simplified iteration using cheesecloth.

Mince the cooked mutton. I used knives, but a processor will do an admirable job.

Beat the eggs, add the saffron to them. Set aside for the moment.

Add the herbs and spices, but not the cloves. Fold together with the cheese. Blend in the eggs to make a homogeneous loaf, not too wet but well stuck together.

Prepare the cheesecloth by dipping it in the broth you  cooked the meat in.

Lay the meat on the cheesecloth, fold it into a tidy parcel.

Mince the rest of the parsley, put it in the blender if you have one. Use a tad of water to help it along. (I don’t have a blender. I used a mortar and pestle. Don’t do that.)

When the parsley is pretty liquid, paint it onto the cheesecloth. Wait a moment for it to saturate, and paint on the rest.

Place the cloves on the surface, piercing the fabric, and roast the loaf on a pan with sides at 350 for about an hour.

*If you are using caul, rinse the caul, stretch it out, and paint it with an egg or two, to help seal it and help it stick to the meat.

Make parsley juice as above.

Blend  two eggs with a quarter cup of flour, and fold in the parsley juice.

Fold the loaf into it, and pin it shut. Paint it with the flour, egg and parsley mixture,

pierce it with the cloves, and roast as above.

To do it properly, you will have closer to 6 pounds of meat, reformed on the bone, which will roast at 200* for 5 hours. The recipe multiplies up pretty well, but you will need more eggs, and several toothpicks to pin on the caul.

Green meat was really tasty. We were disappointed by how much cheese we lost to the cheesecloth, though not surprised.

 

 

9 dumplings, about an inch in all directions, on a plate.

 

To mak hattes in flesche tyme:

To mak hattes in flesshe tyme mak a paiste of pured
flour, knodene with yolks of eggs and mak a stuf of
vele or pork sodene tender and ground with yolks of
eggs putther to mary diced and dates mynced smalle
and raissins of corrans with sugur saffron and salt and
pouder mellid to gedur in paiste and wound foilles of
the brod of a saucere as thyn as ye may dryf them and
dryf them that the bredes may cuver to the middes of
the foile then turn them to gedur that the bredes of
the inor sid met all about and lesse the bred and turn
upward without in the manner of an hatte and close
welle the eggs that they hold full ther in and luk the
stuf haue a good batter made with yolks of eggs and
flour of whet the open sid that is downward luk ther
in that the stuf be clossed and so set it in hot grece up
right and when the battur is fried lay them doun and
serve them.

To make hats in flesh time, make a paste of pure
flour, kneaded with yolks of eggs and make a stuffing
of veal or pork poached tender and ground with yolks of
eggs. Put thereto marrow diced and dates minced small,
and currants and sugar, saffron, and salt, and
powder melded together in paste and wound foils of
the breadth of a saucer and thin as you may draw them and
draw them that the breads may cover the mids of
the goil, then turn them together that the breads of
the inner side meet all about and lease the bread and turn
upward without in the manner of a hat, and close
well the eggs that they hold therein, and look therein
that the stuff be closed and so set it in hot grease up
right and when the batter is fried lay them down and
serve them.

To make hats in flesh time, make egg pasta.

Make a stuffing of veal or pork seethed tender,
with egg yolks, diced marrow, minced dates,
currants, sugar, saffron, salt and “powder” melded together.

all of the ingredients laid out, most of them measured in individual containers.

all in place

Put the stuffing in the dough following rather elaborate instructions which
lead to a dumpling shaped like a hat.

Hattes (14)Hattes (15)Hattes (16) Hattes (17)

 

Make a batter of yolks and flour. Dip the tops of the dumplings in the batter to
be certain the dumplings are all sealed.

Hattes (18)

Fry them til they are pretty and serve them.
I did not poach my meat, as it was preground.
I did not roast my marrow bones. If they smell in any way of ammonia, do not use them.
Whether the yolks are to be preboiled or not for this dish is a question. As most dishes from the basic cuisine do call for hard cooked yolks, I made the assumption. My preferred proportion is 1 yolk per ¼ lb of meat to be used. I find that more than that can be mealy, while less is not up to the task of keeping a dish moist while helping flavors interact.
We had quite a discussion on the nature of Powder. The book this is from has all kinds of powders, with it sometimes referring explicitly to salt, or saffron, or ginger, but sometimes with no signifiers.
I opted for pepper, as it figures regularly in the book as a companion to salt.

If you choose to freeze a part of the recipe, do so before battering, and reduce the batter quantity by the portion appropriate. Place the sealed dumplings on a sheet and freeze them solid, the move them to a bag for storage. They can be fried directly from frozen.

I placed the number that fit in my fryer at a time, which happens to be 8.

The batter destroyed my frying oil, It could not be saved for other dishes. We did not mind.

The Recipe;

2 packs of won ton wrappers (about 50 in the pack, contained egg and nothing weird)
1.5 lbs pork, veal, or as a modern sub, turkey, poached then ground, or simply ground.
6 hard boiled egg yolks, mashed well.
3 oz bone marrow, minced
¼ c currants
¼ c dates, minced
1 tsp sugar
1.5 tsp salt
.5 tsp pepper
1 pinch saffron (you can skip it. We like it. We tasted it.)

For the batter;

For the batter, I used raw yolks. The word is spelled the same way, which was no clue, but I have seen many recipes for a modern whipped egg yolk batter which is quite pleasant, and impossible with cooked yolks.

6 raw yolks, whipped til they turn creamy and pale
add ½ c water, slowly, while continuing to whip.
Add ½ c cake flour or similar, slowly and gently. It will hold well for about a half hour.
Reserve the whites to glue the dumplings shut.

Frying oil, at least an inch deep, and all of the equipment needed for safe frying

For the dumplings;
Blend the entire list of ingredients til it is evenly distributed. Fry a tidbit and taste for seasonings, I am known for a very light hand with salt.

Place a half of an ounce (I used a disher) of meat in the center of each wrapper. Glue the four corners together, making a little pyramid. Seal the sides.
When they are all done,
dip the pointy tops in the batter.

Fry til they are a pale golden color. Drain on a towel, and serve.

 

In discussion, we agreed that a cameline would have been an excellent side, of course depending on the cameline.
This led to a lively debate on the nature of Poudre Lombard, at which point we retired.
To mak sauce camelyn for quaylle

To mak sauce camelyne for quaile, tak whyt bred
and drawe it in the sauce in the manner of guinger
sauce with venyger put ther to pouder of guinger
canelle and pouder-lombard a goodelle and ye may
draw alitille mustard ther with and sesson it up with
mustard that it be douce salt it and colour it with
saffron and serue it.

http://www.medievalcookery.com/notes/napier.txt

a freshly baked pie in a pan. Covered in dried fruit in a geometric pattern, it is in a ceramic dish.

The Good Housewife’s Jewell

To make a veale pie.
Let your Veale boyle a good while, and
when it is boyled, mince it by it selfe,
and the white, by it selfe, and season it with
salt and pepper, cinamon and ginger, and
suger, and cloues and mace, and you muste
haue prunes and raisons, dates & currantes
on the top.

I used a prefab pie crust. There. I said it. I used a prefab, came in a box, frozen crust, leftover from my Mom’s thanksgiving baking, and I won’t do it again. It was a false expediency and unpleasant to work with.
That aside, the rest of the pie was pretty lovely.

We scored a nice ceramic pie pan from a clearance rack, and a breast of veal from a confused vendor, and the rest of the goods we had in stock. (I had the thought of tracking how long my staples last, but because we are feeding so few, I don’t think it would help anyone.)

The breast of veal went into a pot of water which seethed for about 30 minutes on low.
After the pink of it faded and it stopped looking raw around the bones, I allowed it to cool while I prepared the pie crust.
I opted not to blind-bake this crust, though I normally would. To blind bake, prepare a crust, place it in the pan, and bake til brown. Sometimes weights such as beans (cannot be reused for anything else) or specially made ceramic balls are needed to keep the shell from blistering or pulling away from the pan.

While this was happening, my dried fruits, which are very very dry, were soaking up some wine. I sliced the dates the long way to ensure they had no pits, as well.

I received a lovely new mortar and pestle, which made much shorter work of my whole spices than anything prior. The shape of the pestle is very aggressive. I actually achieved fully powdered whole cloves for the first time!

Then I began to prepare the meat. I boned the breast of veal as best I could, and rather than putting the meat into a grinder, I took two knives and whacked it methodically til it was fully minced. This process took about 10 minutes, mostly because I took my time and was very careful.

Unfortunately, my veal had very little fat. It’s so hard to get, and so expensive, that there was no way to source veal fat without some serious gymnastics.
I had to get some form of binder, carrier, and moistener into the dish without use of the fat which naturally would have come with a more appropriate cut, and chose egg whites. Therefore this recipe is a more distant adaptation.

1 breast of veal, about 2.5 lbs w bones
2 egg whites
1 tsp cinnamon
6 cloves
3 leaves of mace
½ tsp ginger
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar

½ cup gewurtztraminer (or what is on hand)
6 prunes
6 dates
1TBS raisins
1 TBS currants

1 pie crust
Heat oven to 350*
Place dried fruit in wine. Set aside.
Roll the pie crust into the pan. Cover with a dampened linen towel or plastic wrap.

Place meat in poaching vessel, almost cover with water. Simmer, turning as needed, til it no longer shows evidence of having rawness.
Remove from heat, allow to cool. (return bones to liquid to make broth after boning meat out, for another dish)
When the meat is cool, mince it or grind it.

a ball of chopped meat in a bowl. It is about the size of a grapefruit. Being parcooked, it is an unappetising color.

parcooked meat, hand minced.

Measure spices, grind or crush if needed, place in a bowl.
Add the egg whites to the same bowl, and whip until the spices are evenly incorporated.

two bowls, one of fruit in wine, one of careful, measured piles of spices in a bowl.

dried fruit soaking, spices ground and measured

Fold the eggs into the meat until evenly incorporated.

Place the meat mixture into the pie crust, and decorate with the soaked dried fruits. Feel the fruits as you go for pits.

Bake at 350* until your meat thermometer gives a 140* reading.

We had this pie with the pear dish posted last week, which was a nice match. (Good Housewife’s Jewell has an iteration called To Preserve Wardens.)
It held overnight in the fridge very well, and reheated admirably.

two slices of pie on plates to be served, the remainder of the pie in the baking pan.

The pie was aromatic and lovely.

This is an excellent picnic dish.

I got lucky! I managed to get a beautiful shoulder of mutton locally. This is a rare treat.

While mutton has a reputation for strong flavor and aroma, I find this to be misleading. The meat has a distinctive flavor, yes, as opposed to the bland meats of the supermarket, but the flavor is in fact a component of the dish, rather than an obstacle to be overcome. We don’t need to season as assertively if the foods we are working with bring plenty to the table.

I love mutton.

.  I had a shoulder, not a thigh. Thigh is the same cut as leg of lamb, minus the shank. Leg has more meat and simpler carving, and less intramuscular fat. Surface fat is where stronger flavors tend to lie, so peel off any fat that has yellowing to it, no matter what cut you may have. Shoulder is a bit of a bear, as it has all kinds of bones and things going through it, it’s the tough end of a tough animal. It takes some care to carve, but with a little patience pays off quite nicely. A major modern advantage is that a shoulder fits pots more easily. Please don’t get one of those boneless legs of lamb in a net, they are not going to offer enough in the way of flavor to be worth the cost.

Beef or veal fat is suggested as the cooking grease because sheep fat sets at a low temperature, causing objectionable texture. It’s important to peel off that surface fat. Hand it to a soapmaker if you are uncomfortable discarding it.

This translation is from http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/Cookbooks/Menagier/Menagier.html

Item MUTTON PIE in a POT. Take a thigh (of mutton), and grease or marrow of beef or veal chopped small and onions chopped small, and set to boil and cook in a well-covered pot in a small amount of meat stock or other liquid, then put to boil in it spices, and a little vinegar to sharpen it, and arrange it in a dish.

Item, if you want to salt mutton in hot weather, moisten beforehand, and sprinkle with coarse ground salt.

 

1 leg (or shoulder) of mutton (goat, lamb, venison), about 4 lbs including bone.

2-3 baseball sized onions, cut to a fine dice

1/4 lb suit, optional

a quart of good stock or broth

1 TBSP salt

1 tsp grains of paradise

1/4 stick cinnamon, or a quarter teaspoon

heads off about a dozen cloves, or about a quarter teaspoon of ground cloves

1/4 c red wine vinegar

IMG_5008

Choose a pot with a well fitting lid, that the meat will fit snugly. A slow cooker is an excellent option for this dish.

Place the meat, onions, and stock in the pot. Add suet if you feel you ought to add some fat to the dish. This will help temper the mutton flavor.  (I did not add fat)

IMG_5009

Seethe on a low flame with the lid on for approximately two hours, then add the spices to the pot. Add about half of the vinegar at this time as well.

Continue cooking for another 30-45 minutes. The meat ought to be rather tender and fully cooked to the falling-off the bone stage.
Remove the meat, reserving the cooking liquid. Taste for balance, add more vinegar and reboil, if needed.

If the sauce is too greasy, you might use a gravy separator, float a towel on top to absorb, or carefully drag an ice cube across the surface to quickly set the fat, making it easier to remove.

Allow to cool, slice, serve. with the sauce made of cooking liquid.

 

I chose my spices based on what blends are common in the book, what would taste nice together, and what I believe would play nicely with the flavors inherent in the onions and meat. You may choose your spices differently. For instance, the dish Yellow Mutton calls for saffron, ginger and verjus, while another note says that if venison is basted, it may be served with cameline, which implies to me that a poached dish should specifically not be served with cameline. Other notes in the manuscript say that in summer use saffron, but in winter use pepper.  I feel my choices to be internally consistent, and successful.

I cannot grind my cloves as finely as commercially available. I would use commercially ground cloves, or perhaps stick whole cloves into one section of onion in order to more easily remove them later.

The onions as I presented them were not chopped finely enough. I suggest making them about the size of modern gambling dice.

While this has little to do with our modern understanding of pie, lacking crust and being a very simple pot stew, it is not roasted before seething, nor after. The meat is intended to be cooked once, so it must be cooked fully.

 

 http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/Cookbooks/Menagier/Menagier.html 

to prepare an ox tongue en croute (1)

The first two recipes in Book V of the Opera are for the preparation of tongue as a pie. It’s not the dish most of us would expect to start a book on pies with, but it makes a lot of sense in context.

Cattle provide many pounds of meat, but the tongue, which is rich, tender, and profoundly beefy in flavor, is only two to four pounds of service quality food. It is considered a luxury meat in many cuisines, though it does present challenges to the preparation,

Tongue must be skinned before service. It also must be trimmed carefully, If you do not know how to do this, look for a video to guide you, or ask for assistance the first time.

It also has a reputation for being “creepy meat”, for looking too much like what it is. This alone makes pie a thoughtful presentation; even if the diners know what they are getting, they do not have to confront it visually in a way they might otherwise find challenging.

These two recipes specify ox, working cattle, but also permit cow or buffalo cow using the same instructions. The recipes are somewhat mix and match, or perhaps more, choose your own adventure. Direction is given for whole or sliced, cooked or raw (scalded), pickled (raw) or plain, and salted/pressed or not.

I opted to scald, slice, pickle, not press, then place in pastry and bake.

The tongue I had in the freezer came improperly trimmed, so I spend about two hours cleaning it. I was displeased. Skinning also took rather longer than intended. I should have allowed it to sit in the poaching water longer, but did not want to negatively affect the pickling process.

I then sliced the meat into slices which I now feel to have been too thick for the most pleasing pie, though at the end it worked out.

The pickling vinegar was very pleasing, and added a lovely layer of flavor. The instructions specified 8 hours, but it was in the brine for 12 hours. Due to the thickness of my slices, it was not problematic.

After the meat was removed from the brine, I built a crust. The book gives a lot of suggestions about what kinds of crusts to use, how to prepare them, what seasons and conditions are appropriate for what crusts, but it doesn’t give the kind of directions that I, a non-baker, can easily extrapolate into the required product.

The directions specifically state “make up a dough with unsalted cold water” which to me implies that there is such a thing in this repertoire as warm water dough, as I am accustomed to using for coffyns. The instructions go on to explain how to knead it, when to apply fat, and that the dough will work best if it remains cold.

Instructions called for sifting the flour well to remove bran. I did use a locally milled soft wheat flour, and did sift it. For every cup of sieved flour, I had a cup of bran left behind.

The book specified a free-form pie rather than one fitted to a pie pan, but frankly I was unwilling to risk the floor of my oven. I had little trust in my crust, and expected odd behaviour from the meat. I used a pie pan. My crust was too small, so I was forced to create a false wall with aluminum foil. Unfortunately, my crust was a miserable failure. Though tasty, it was by no means a good case to contain the dish. I will try a completely different approach to the crust next time.

I removed the meat from the pickling seasonings and drained it, but did not blot.

After laying the meat into the base of the crust, placing on a lovely layer of salt fat, seasoning and closing the crust, I baked it in a 400* oven, as the book said to bake it at a temperature suitable for bread. I used my nose to tell me when it was done, and was pretty on the ball with that. Unfortunately, the temperature was too high for the melting point of the fat in the meat, and did some damage.

After being quite sad to see how poorly the dish turned out, we took everthing apart after it had cooled completely, chopped it into small pieces, and sauteed it. It was absolutely delicious. My guest was concerned by the concept of eating tongue, but expressed delight in the dish. Gingerbrede made an excellent dessert.

Recipe and sub recipes;

1 whole beef tongue, prepared

Pickle brine (below)

Spice blend (below)

1 oz prosciutto trim (ask your deli for an end, if possible)

1 sturdy pasty (not pastry) crust

Spice blend:

1 tsp salt

1 tsp pepper

1/4 tsp cloves

1/4 tsp cinnamon

1/8 tsp ginger

1/8 tsp nutmeg

(double the salt and pepper, quadruple the rest, if you prefer not to pickle)

 

Pickle brine

1/2 cup red wine vinegar (thin a little with water if it is very sharp)

1/2 cup white wine (I used a moscato)

1 tsp dried oregano

1/2 TBS salt

1/4 TBS pepper

2 cloves garlic, crushed well. (use the salt as an abrasive to help break the cloves well)

2 TBS mustum ( I did not use this, as I am running out)

 

poach or parcook meat ( I should have poached longer)

skin and trim meat

slice into service escalopes (I should have sliced much thinner)

pickle if desired

prepare crust

season meat

dress with fat or prosciutto (proscuitto tasted better)

seal crust, make vent

bake at 350*

oil crust on removal from oven, or wash with saffron water, but do not egg wash.

Do a better job than I did, please. When I get it right I will post this recipe again.

 

(NOTE: There are no photographs or beauty shots of this dish because it is not attractive to look at. I did photograph the entire process, so if you need reference images please do not hesitate to contact me.)

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=GrvhZvK5pCgC&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:%22Bartolomeo+Scappi%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=_4EbVKr9Do-eyASyg4DYAQ&ved=0CEQQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q&f=false

p 435

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=7yZAAAAAcAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:%22Bartolomeo+Scappi%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=7IMbVNXsO8-cyASisoKYAw&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

p228

There’s a question of what exactly “resola” is. It might be the pluck, it might be a type of sausage, it might be a leftover of another kind of dish.

Being that there is boiled garlic in the recipe, I went with a type of sausage which relies on fresh meat and garlic. We both like garlic, he does not like pluck. It worked out well.

Because I was not stuffing a whole piglet or kid, I made way too much stuffing. I cooked the rest in a separate pot, more like a terrine. The roast I used only took about a quarter cup of filling.

First I poached some heads of garlic. I figure it freezes well, so poach once, enjoy often. Then I cubed up some salted fat, which I trimmed of skin, and a bit of meat.

the non-meat ingredients for the dish in bowls waiting to be added

meats in the pan, veg on the counter

This all got sauteed til the fat was mostly rendered, and everything was cooked.

sausage, salt-fat, and minced meat in the pan

the sausages are about 3″ long.

After cooling, the meats all went into a processor with the onion and the herbs, and was pulsed til it was quite homogeneous. The raisins were forgotten, and only two eggs were needed to get the texture to what I was looking for.

At this point, I opened a pocket in the loin I was stuffing, and poured in as much as it would take.

a loin roast with a large pocket cut into it, being prepared for stuffing

a reasonably large pocket

It was roasted in a high oven, then rested for about 15 minutes.

After resting, it was sliced in half and served, where it was met with great appreciation.

Recipe: To Stuff a Kid

Ingredients

  • Two small garlic sausages (recipe another time)
  • Two ounces of salt-fat, cubed
  • Two ounces of raw meat, cubed
  • Four ounces raw onion
  • One ounce parlsey and marjoram
  • Two cloves boiled garlic
  • Two ounces raisins
  • Thick chops, loin roast, small whole meat item, or a terrine mold to place filling in.

Instructions

  1. Boil garlic, set aside to cool
  2. Sautee meats til done and fat rendered. Allow to cool.
  3. Mince meat together with the onion, garlic, and herbs
  4. Fold in eggs and raisins.
  5. Stuff meat item or prepared mold, and roast or bake in bain marie as appropriate.

Variations

– unknown major ingredient – expensive ingredients -heavy on pork, an ingredient that does not always play well -muscles or processor needed, not a simple construction. + flexible service, can fit different aspects of a menu +can be made ahead if good temperatures can be managed.

Preparation time:

 

Norse Pies

Simple instructions for a complex palate!

Norse pies come in several iterations, from pike to “meat.”

 

In the Viander of Taillevent, the guidance is to use cooked meat, pine nut paste, currants, and harvest cheese chopped small with sugar and a little salt.

We had leftover chicken from the other night’s roast, and went with it. I put about a quarter cup of pine nuts into the processor and pulsed til they were a crumbly nut butter. Then I added about the same amount of raisins (still out of currants!) and pulsed again. 3 cups of chicken went in with this mix, and were pulsed until the whole thing was crumbly and fine, but not a paste.

We tasted for flavor, and agreed that the raisins were sweet enough for our taste, but the salt was lacking, and fixed that.

Using a pie machine and commercial pie dough, we cooked the pies until done, and they did not last long.

+This iteration of norse pies can be made successfully with beef, ground beef, lamb, mutton, pretty much anything with feet.

+We have been satisfied with whole pine nuts, pine nut paste, currants, raisins, cubed meat, diced meat, and anything else we have thought of.

+simple construction

+few ingredients, so few incompatibilities on a menu

+freeze well

+scale up or down well.

– pine nuts, currants, and meat are not cheap, and there are no fillers. It’s not enough of a showstopper for the cost.

 

-Unfortunately, no pics this week, the camera took a bit of a nap.

“Neapolitan Recipe Collection”

as translated by Terence Scully

Recipe 46

Goat Kid or Mutton with Thick Broth Get kid or mutton and cut it into small pieces, and put it into a pot with salt pork, then get sage, mint and onion, and cook everyhting together; then get good spices and saffron, distemper them with the meat’s broth and let everything boil together until the meat falls apart, then lift the meat out into a dish with the thick broth.

After boning out a shoulder of mutton, I peeled as much silverskin as I could, and sliced it into “spoon-size” bits of about a half-ounce each.

a deep pan with mutton chopped to about half-ounce bits, a chopped onion, and seasonings

on low heat.

Then I chopped the onion the way I sometimes like to; in half, then slice one half finely. I did this so the larger one could signal the cookedness of the dish, and the quantity would not overwhelm the small portion being made. It also made for a handy spot to stick cloves later.

Only having dried herbs, I used the sage, but chose savory over plain mint. Dried mint does nothing for me, and savory struck me as a good and tasty compromise. I don’t suggest it, it didn’t quite fit the palate.

I have salt-pork, it is unsmoked streaky bacon. I put two slices of about an ounce each into the pot. Had I chosen not to use it, I would have used olive oil and salt

Though the dish calls for no water, I added a small amount, being of the thought that a “pot” is a wet-cooking vessel. Though the meat did later give broth, it needed some liquid to start. Sticking would have ruined dinner.

The dish was cooked with a lid on the whole time.

 

After the meat cooked through, I added cracked pepper, a couple of cloves and a shard of cinnamon. Again, I am not a fan of using saffron except when I know the dish is otherwise honed, and feel it is worth the expense. Sunday dinner is not that time.

Had I used a larger quantity of powdered spices, I would have put them into another, smaller pot with broth and allowed them to simmer together (distempering) til the broth was thickened and the spices were homogeneous. As I was using a small amount of whole spice, this step would not have been beneficial, and the broth was not thick as a result.

After an hour the meat is cooked but not to tenderness, and the onion half is completely soft. I put the lid back on and simmered at low for another twenty minutes, then served it up.

 

the same pan, an hour later, with a rich broth, collapsing half-onion, and tender meat

it's ready for plating.

1 lb lean meat, trimmed and cubed.

1 onion, medium, halved and one half sliced thin.

½ tsp sage, dried

(½ tsp savory, dried, used here but not preferred)

(1 TBS mint, preferred, would be best fresh)

2-4 oz salt pork (or other fat and salt)

(do not add salt to the dish unless you skip the salt pork)

2-4 oz water

3 cloves

an inch of cinnamon

½ tsp cracked long pepper

 

Place the  meat and onion  in the pot with a small amount of water, and set burner to medium.

Add herbs, and put the lid on the pot.

After 45 minutes to an hour, either

add your whole spices or

remove a cup of the cooking liquid, and add your powdered spices to it, then in a separate pot, simmer the spices for a few moments until they become homogeneous with the broth. At this point, re-introduce the now-spiced broth to the pot, tasting for balance. You may not choose to use it all.

Put the lid back on the pot, lower the temperature and continue cooking until the meat is ready to fall apart.

Check for salt, and serve.

 

A pot with a good lid is about all you really need to pull this off. A second, smaller pot for simmering the spices would be useful.

Ratings;

– “hidden” pork product. Make sure it’s marked when feeding groups.

– really needs the fresh herbs

– not the most popular meat.

– not the most evocative dish.

+ toss it in the pot and forget it, then simmer the spices in some of the broth. Pretty simple.

+ Minimal waste, made from trim.

+ great “intro” dish, easy to take a small portion, and not unfamiliar flavors.

The English Housewife

Gervase Markham pp 76-77

This loosely written recipe calls for “a neck of veal, or a leg, or marrow bones of beef, or a pullet, or mutton.”
Versatility is good.

(oops! No final picture! We ate it!)

It’s a simple meat-in-a-pot affair, poached, skimmed well (albumen, the white to brown frothy stuff, is a form of protein which is unappealing) and thickened by pressing trimmed, broth-soaked bread through a sieve.
Then fruits and spices are added, the dish can be optionally colored with turnsole or sanders (a red food dye made from the wood of a tree), and served on by first putting sippets, soup-toasts, then layering on the broth, meat, “and the fruit uppermost.”

We had very nice shoulder of mutton, everything called for except currants, and a bitter cold day which needed soup.

a bowl with meat, and another with dried fruit and sliced bread. A small pinch-bowl has the cloves and mace blades.

Everything ready to use.

After trimming and rinsing the meat into the pot and simmering in plainb water for about an hour, I took some of the hot broth and started soaking the sliced, staled bread. The recipe called for de-crusting the loaves, I should have obeyed. I figured a modern baguette would have a more tender crust than a manchet. Oops.

Soaked bread being pressed over a bowl. The broth pressed through is very starchy, to thicken the pot.

pressing bread

After pressing the bread in to the pot to add starch for body, I added the fruits and spices and let it cook a while longer.

dried fruit being placed into the pot of hot broth, which appears white from the starch of the just-pressed bread.

adding fruit

Not being interested in adding sanders to the whole dish, I did a side-by-side to show the difference between plain and enhanced. Interestingly, the sanders somewhat emulsified the broth.

two identical bowls, one with broth, the other with a little sanders blended in. The one with sanders is slightly redder, and the floating oils are emulsified into the broth.

there is a visible difference.

 

We agreed that the quantities of fruit called for made the dish excessively sweet. This is a situation I have run into frequently, with a single ingredient having quantities and none of the others being specified. It makes sense to me that these are “key” ingredients, suggesting proportions for other items, and that the recipes are intended to serve rather more than two people.

When I make this again, I will use 1/8 (modern) fruit per pound of meat, a proportion which I am comfortable with.

Recipe:
3 lbs mutton (or something)
6 oz prunes
6 oz raisins
3 oz currents (subbed with more raisins)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp mace blades
3 whole cloves, cracked

Ratings;
+ almost any protein
+ simple stovetop, minimal fuss
+ inexpensive common ingredients (mace is cheap in Indian markets)
+reasonably quick to cook.
– not obvious use of bread product, needs clear gluten warning.
– cloyingly sweet as written
– don’t leave spices loose as I did, put them in cheesecloth. Someone will be unhappy.
– the resulting broth is not an ingredient. It’s a final product, which will not be easy to cannibalise for future recipes.

In spite of the “more minuses than pluses,” the pluses are of greater value, in my mind.
This simple dish takes one burner, three separate moments of attention, and has a very limited ingredient list.
It would be very nice on a cold winters’ day to tide one over ’til dinner.

I’m making it again this week, just way lighter on the fruit.