9 dumplings, about an inch in all directions, on a plate.

 

To mak hattes in flesche tyme:

To mak hattes in flesshe tyme mak a paiste of pured
flour, knodene with yolks of eggs and mak a stuf of
vele or pork sodene tender and ground with yolks of
eggs putther to mary diced and dates mynced smalle
and raissins of corrans with sugur saffron and salt and
pouder mellid to gedur in paiste and wound foilles of
the brod of a saucere as thyn as ye may dryf them and
dryf them that the bredes may cuver to the middes of
the foile then turn them to gedur that the bredes of
the inor sid met all about and lesse the bred and turn
upward without in the manner of an hatte and close
welle the eggs that they hold full ther in and luk the
stuf haue a good batter made with yolks of eggs and
flour of whet the open sid that is downward luk ther
in that the stuf be clossed and so set it in hot grece up
right and when the battur is fried lay them doun and
serve them.

To make hats in flesh time, make a paste of pure
flour, kneaded with yolks of eggs and make a stuffing
of veal or pork poached tender and ground with yolks of
eggs. Put thereto marrow diced and dates minced small,
and currants and sugar, saffron, and salt, and
powder melded together in paste and wound foils of
the breadth of a saucer and thin as you may draw them and
draw them that the breads may cover the mids of
the goil, then turn them together that the breads of
the inner side meet all about and lease the bread and turn
upward without in the manner of a hat, and close
well the eggs that they hold therein, and look therein
that the stuff be closed and so set it in hot grease up
right and when the batter is fried lay them down and
serve them.

To make hats in flesh time, make egg pasta.

Make a stuffing of veal or pork seethed tender,
with egg yolks, diced marrow, minced dates,
currants, sugar, saffron, salt and “powder” melded together.

all of the ingredients laid out, most of them measured in individual containers.

all in place

Put the stuffing in the dough following rather elaborate instructions which
lead to a dumpling shaped like a hat.

Hattes (14)Hattes (15)Hattes (16) Hattes (17)

 

Make a batter of yolks and flour. Dip the tops of the dumplings in the batter to
be certain the dumplings are all sealed.

Hattes (18)

Fry them til they are pretty and serve them.
I did not poach my meat, as it was preground.
I did not roast my marrow bones. If they smell in any way of ammonia, do not use them.
Whether the yolks are to be preboiled or not for this dish is a question. As most dishes from the basic cuisine do call for hard cooked yolks, I made the assumption. My preferred proportion is 1 yolk per ¼ lb of meat to be used. I find that more than that can be mealy, while less is not up to the task of keeping a dish moist while helping flavors interact.
We had quite a discussion on the nature of Powder. The book this is from has all kinds of powders, with it sometimes referring explicitly to salt, or saffron, or ginger, but sometimes with no signifiers.
I opted for pepper, as it figures regularly in the book as a companion to salt.

If you choose to freeze a part of the recipe, do so before battering, and reduce the batter quantity by the portion appropriate. Place the sealed dumplings on a sheet and freeze them solid, the move them to a bag for storage. They can be fried directly from frozen.

I placed the number that fit in my fryer at a time, which happens to be 8.

The batter destroyed my frying oil, It could not be saved for other dishes. We did not mind.

The Recipe;

2 packs of won ton wrappers (about 50 in the pack, contained egg and nothing weird)
1.5 lbs pork, veal, or as a modern sub, turkey, poached then ground, or simply ground.
6 hard boiled egg yolks, mashed well.
3 oz bone marrow, minced
¼ c currants
¼ c dates, minced
1 tsp sugar
1.5 tsp salt
.5 tsp pepper
1 pinch saffron (you can skip it. We like it. We tasted it.)

For the batter;

For the batter, I used raw yolks. The word is spelled the same way, which was no clue, but I have seen many recipes for a modern whipped egg yolk batter which is quite pleasant, and impossible with cooked yolks.

6 raw yolks, whipped til they turn creamy and pale
add ½ c water, slowly, while continuing to whip.
Add ½ c cake flour or similar, slowly and gently. It will hold well for about a half hour.
Reserve the whites to glue the dumplings shut.

Frying oil, at least an inch deep, and all of the equipment needed for safe frying

For the dumplings;
Blend the entire list of ingredients til it is evenly distributed. Fry a tidbit and taste for seasonings, I am known for a very light hand with salt.

Place a half of an ounce (I used a disher) of meat in the center of each wrapper. Glue the four corners together, making a little pyramid. Seal the sides.
When they are all done,
dip the pointy tops in the batter.

Fry til they are a pale golden color. Drain on a towel, and serve.

 

In discussion, we agreed that a cameline would have been an excellent side, of course depending on the cameline.
This led to a lively debate on the nature of Poudre Lombard, at which point we retired.
To mak sauce camelyn for quaylle

To mak sauce camelyne for quaile, tak whyt bred
and drawe it in the sauce in the manner of guinger
sauce with venyger put ther to pouder of guinger
canelle and pouder-lombard a goodelle and ye may
draw alitille mustard ther with and sesson it up with
mustard that it be douce salt it and colour it with
saffron and serue it.

http://www.medievalcookery.com/notes/napier.txt

Parsnips make me happy, that was reason enough to make this dish.

I chose small, tender parsnips of about 5-8″ long, and not much more than 2″ across. The larger ones were in poor condition,

Parsnips (1)

First, after peeling them, I cut them into 5 sections so they would cook evenly. If yours are larger, you may get more sections, though I do suggest removing the core on any parsnip over 3″ across or 10″ long. The cores are a challenge to eat no matter how good your teeth.

Parsnips (2)

I used water to poach them, but added salt.  A broth would have been a nice poaching medium, but I wanted to keep the preparation simple.

The flour is a locally milled whole wheat which I sieved to reduce the rough matter.  The saffron steeped in warm water for about 15 minutes while I cut and poached the vegetables.

I chose to fry in grapeseed oil, which I keep on hand. It is a modernly available oil with minimal flavor and a high smoke point. My assumption is that olive oil or lard might have been more likely, but I did not wish to use either.

They are heavy, but they didn’t completely fail overnighting in the refrigerator. I reheated them in a dry pan in the oven at 300 for about 15 minutes.

 

170. Parsnips.

Clean big ones well and remove the woody part in the middle, and boil them; when they are cooked, flour them and fry them in good oil- but before that, dry them well on a small board; then, to make them better, get a bowl of flour tempered with water, add sugar, cinnamon, saffron and rosewater, coat the parsnips with this mixture and put them in the pan with hot oil; then put spices on top of them and serve them properly seasoned like that.

 

1-2 lbs parsnips, cut into 1/2″x 4″ spears

1/2 c flour

1 TBS sugar (promotes browning, can be omitted)

6-8 threads of saffron, bloomed in 1/4 C warm water

1/2 tsp cinnamon (Canela)

1/2 – 1 oz rosewater, to taste

Water to complete batter

Sufficient oil to fry

salt and pepper, for after frying

A heated oven for the parsnips to rest in

knife and board for trimming

a cloth or wooden rest area for the parsnips to dry while making the batter

 

 

Place saffron in water before beginning other processes.
Choose small parsnips.

Wash and peel parsnips. Cut to half length, then cut the thick section into quarters the long way, so all 5 pieces are about the same size.

Poach the cut parsnips til cooked most of the way through, but not enough to turn to mush.

Parsnips (4)

Allow to cool.

Make batter: by blending dry ingredients then adding liquid til it is a runny consistency. Set aside.

Parsnips (5)

Prepare frying oil, taking the usual precautions.

Dip parsnips in batter, fry. (watch some videos if you are not comfortable with frying. Using a countertop frying machine makes sense)

Parsnips (7)

Remove to a screen or cloth to give up excess oil.

Serve.  We really like this with recipe 157 from Los Guisados; Horseradish http://www.florilegium.org/?http%3A//www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-MANUSCRIPTS/Guisados1-art.html

Parsnips (9)

Scully, Terence. The Neapolitan Recipe Collection. 4th ed. University of Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 2000.  Print.

 

XLV Si vols fer bunyols, hages de la pasta damunt dita, que sia llevada, ee ous ab formatge rattlat; e sia tot mesclat e be espes. E fe’n redolins aixi com un ou. E hages una cassola e del greix dessus dit; gita’ls en cassola. E, quan seran cuits, posa’ls en un tallador ab sucre dessus e dejus.

If you want to make cheese fritters, take the dough described above, which is leavened, and eggs with grated cheese. Everything should be mixed together and quite thick.And make round shapes like an egg. Take a casserole dish and some of the grease saif above, pour (the fritters) into the dish. And when they are cooked, put them on a plate wuuthh sugar over and under.
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1/2 cup warm (100 degrees F) water, for proofing
2 c warm water, divided
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour plus 1/2 cup
3 oz Manchego, grated
1 TBS salt

frying oil, fryolator

(part of an ongoing series in which I share recipes presented at The Lay of El Cid hosted by Barony Bhakail)

I like these as a cheesy beignet. We made them small, about a half ounce of dough per bunyol, as they puff when frying and are quite rich.

The recipe really relies on a flavorful cheese. We used an earthy Manchego.  Our poor fry guy could not keep up with demand.

Dissolve yeast in ½ c warm water. Wait til foamy, add 1 c water and the bulk of the flour. Incorporate.
Allow to rise 1-3 hr til doubled.
Reserve the last cup of water.
Fold dough into last cup water, adding cheese as you go.
Add more flour if needed.
Allow to rise as time permits, at least 15 mins while prepping fryer depending on the ambient temperature.
This dough really does not need a full rise.

Fry.

Salt as they come out of the fryer.
Dust w more cheese if available. Serve.

Rest on platters lined with paper.
Move them so they don’t get soggy.
Serve in a bowl lined with cloth towels, but they probably won’t last long enough to worry about sogginess.

Santanach, Joan, trans. Robin Vozelgang. The Book of Sent Sovi Medieval Recipes from Catalonia. First Edition. Barcelona, Spain: Barcino-Tamesis, 2008. 132-133. Print.

Robin, Vogelzang. The Book of Sent Sovi: Medieval recipes from Catalonia. Tamesis Books, 2008. 191. Print.

Mushrooms are some of my favorite things. This is one of my favorite ways to eat them.

The instructions start with a parcook of mushrooms, the instructions are similar to modern ones.

a black pan with a tangle of slender pale mushrooms simmering

a little water, a little oil. The water boils off, the mushrooms fry instead of burning

If you want to make sauce of mushrooms that are boiled, pressed, and fried with oil, make the sauce like this:

My preferred way of cooking things like mushrooms is to put them in a pan with enough water to get them cooking, and enough oil to fry them, so they cook enough to not absorb the oil they will then fry in. It works really well.

After instructing on seasoning, the book tell us to make pieces of the mushrooms to fry, or serve with a fried mixture, and then put them in their sauce, or serve them grilled with salt and oil.

the same mushrooms, a few minutes later. Herbs and an onion have been added, the heat has been turned off

waiting for them to cool

This to me implies that the mushrooms can be served as a mince, a hash, a sauce, or served as a side dish in a more whole nature.

My decision is to cook the mushrooms with the seasonings, mince them, and stuff mushroom caps with the mushroom mince, then bake them. It’s a side dish, an hors d’ouvre, and a treat.

mushroom caps stuffed with minced mushrooms, ready to be plated.

mushrooms do deserve to be the star of the show once in a while.

 

Recipe: Sent Sovi Mushroom Sauce XVII

Ingredients

  • 1 pint mushroom caps, stems separated
  • 1/4 cup stems and mushrooms
  • 1/4 c water
  • 1 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 sprig marjoram
  • 1 sprig parsley
  • 1/4 tsp mace
  • 2 Tbs onions, minced
  • 1/8 tsp ginger
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper
  • 2 Tbs red wine vinegar
  • salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Place the stems and ugly mushrooms into a pan with the water and olive oil, simmer until the water is gone. When the water is gone, the frying begins, and stirring must commence.
  2. Mince the onions, marjoram and parsley, toss them into the pan with the spices at about the same time the water boils off.
  3. After the mushrooms are showing good color and the onions are cooked through, put in the wine vinegar with a little more water, to make sure it distributes, this will be boiled off as well and we want everything to have the brightness it adds.
  4. When the mushrooms are fully cooked, preheat the oven to 400 ( I make this as a side dish, so there’s usually a roast already in there. Just use whatever temperature it needs to be, and keep a sharp eye on them.)
  5. Mince the sauteed mix as soon as it is cool enough to handle.
  6. Place the hollow caps into a small, shallow baking dish or pan, and tuck some of the minced mixture into each one.
  7. Put a little water into the baking dish, just enough to barely cover the bottom, and if you like, place some loose foil overtop, in order to allow some steam to form and assist the cooking.
  8. When the caps are cooked through, the dish is done. It’s not the most elaborate, it doesn’t have the overwhelming richness of many modern versions, but it is intensely mushroomy, it’s vegetarian, and it’s easy to make ahead.
  9. The minced mix could be used in a number of ways, such as a tartlet filling, a kebab, or a hand-pie.

Variations

– not as rich and intense as most modern variants

– slightly fussy

+ tasty

+ veggie

+ shares an oven well

+ keeps well, reheats well.

Preparation time: 45 minute(s)

Cooking time: 45 minute(s)

Number of servings (yield): 2