Cormarye. XX.II. XIII. Take Colyandre, Caraway smale grounden, Powdour of Peper and garlec ygrounde in rede wyne, medle alle þise togyder and salt it, take loynes of Pork rawe and fle of the skyn, and pryk it wel with a knyf and lay it in the sawse, roost þerof what þou wilt, & kepe þat þat fallith þerfro in the rosting and seeþ it in a possynet with faire broth, & serue it forth witþ þe roost anoon.

Cormarye (12)

I had not run into this dish before, but it was on a menu recently and intrigued me. The spices are very simple. The instructions are very basic. The results remind me of pastrami. Thanks much to Annetje van Woerden for pointing out the recipe!

Take coriander, caraway ground small, pepper, garlic which has been crushed in red wine. Meddle all this together and salt it. Take raw pork loin, well pricked, and lay it in the sauce. Roast it, but keep the fat.  When it is roasted, seeth it in a tight pot in nice broth. Include the drippings.

Cormarye (3)

So simple, so good.

I have done this with many types of meat and not been unhappy with it. My favorite is short ribs.

3 TBS whole coriander

3 TBS whole caraway seeds, crushed well

5 cloves of garlic

1/2 bottle of red wine

4 LBS meat

2 TBS salt

Trim your meat of silverskin, but leave the fat cap.
Prick the meat to allow the marinade to penetrate.

Place in a zip bag.

Pour the spices in the bag, add wine, and squeeze out the air.

Allow to sit overnight or longer, if you wish, it will only improve.

Roast on a rack. I like to put a little water in the bottom of the pan so the drippings don’t burn.

Allow to cool, then seethe (or steam) the meat.

You can carve a larger, roasted piece into useful sections and steam at need.

It’s rather simple, it’s very tasty, and it’s very flexible.

73 Take chiches  wrye hem in askes al nyght other al a day, other lay hem in hoot aymers. At morowe waische hem clene in water, and do hem ouere the fire with clene water, Seeth them up  and do therto oyle, garlek hole safroun, poudour fort and salt, seeth it & messe it forth.

 

Take chickpeas and set them in ashes and embers all night or all day.

Wash them clean in water, seethe them up,

add whole garlic, oil, powder fort, and salt.

Simmer together and serve.

 

I had a few options for this, though not the one I was most interested in; I do not have fresh chickpeas.

I first split a bag of dried chickpeas, and soaked half overnight.

Then I roasted the soaked peas, the still dry from the bag ones, and a tray of canned peas.

I treated the three iterations the same, as I wanted to see what different results I got.

The ones which had been soaked then roasted wound up tasting a lot like soggy, cooked corn nuts.

Those which had not been presoaked were reminiscent of uncooked potatoes in texture, with a bit of the nutty notes from the soaked and roasted iteration.

The canned peas were just about halfway between the two.

TL; Canned. TR: Dried and soaked. Bottom, Dried, not soaked.

TL; Canned. TR: Dried and soaked. Bottom, Dried, not soaked.

If I can get fresh chickpeas, I might revisit this dish.

I used powdre fort which was a very kind gift from a friend. It was pleasant.

spices measured for the dish.

Working with what I did for the dried, unsoaked peas, here’s what we did;

 

1 bag chickpeas, picked over.

1/4 c olive oil

1 TBS garlic, whole or minced

1 tsp powdre fort

1 tsp salt

1 pinch saffron, to taste

Roast peas for a few hours at 250*. They won’t change color.

Simmer them in water for an hour. Add salt.

Continue simmering, add spices and saffron.

Keep an eye on the water level.

When you taste and find them fully cooked, add the olive oil

and raise the temperature on the pot slightly.

Cook off excess liquid. Stir til incorporated.

The flavor is quite nice. The texture is a bit potato-like.